Differential effectiveness of two anxiety induction procedures in youth and older adult populations.

  • Roberto Nuevo School of Social & Community Medicine, University of Bristol, UK
  • Ignacio Montorio Autónoma University of Madrid, Faculty of Psychology, Madrid, Spain.
  • Isabel Cabrera Autónoma University of Madrid, Faculty of Psychology, Madrid, Spain.
  • María Márquez Autónoma University of Madrid, Faculty of Psychology, Madrid, Spain.
  • María Izal Autónoma University of Madrid, Faculty of Psychology, Madrid, Spain.
Keywords: Emotion, cognition, mood induction, experiment, aging.

Abstract

In this study, we tested in older and younger adults the efficacy of two well-known procedures to experimentally induce anxiety: a) Velten self-statements combined with music; b) film scenes. We extended the previous findings in this field to the understudied area of mood induction in older adults. Fifty-seven older adults and 94 college students were randomly assigned to one of the experimental conditions or to a control group. Results indicated that both procedures were effective, according to a series of ANOVAs for several self-report, physiological, and behavioral measures. Likewise, the highest effect sizes were observed for the Velten procedure (g = .81 vs. g = .71), and the effects were significantly higher in younger (g = 1.0 in the Velten condition) than in older adults (g = .62), Q=4.25, 2(1), p = .0392. Both procedures were effective to induce inducting anxiety in both age groups, especially the Velten procedure in younger adults. Therefore, Velten self-statements combined with music may be very useful anxiety induction procedure for further research in controlled situations of emotions across the life-span.

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Published
24-12-2014
How to Cite
Nuevo, R., Montorio, I., Cabrera, I., Márquez, M., & Izal, M. (2014). Differential effectiveness of two anxiety induction procedures in youth and older adult populations. Anales De Psicología / Annals of Psychology, 31(1), 28-36. https://doi.org/10.6018/analesps.31.1.162281
Section
Clinical and Health Psychology