Perfectionism and risk factors for the development of eating disorders in Spanish adolescents of both genders

  • Lidia Pamies Universidad Miguel Hernández de Elche
  • Yolanda Quiles Universidad Miguel Hernández de Elche
Keywords: Perfectionism, risk factor, adolescents, personality, eating disorders.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to assess the dimensions of perfectionism that are linked to risk eating behaviors in a representative sample of  Spanish adolescents of both genders, and analyze the differences in these dimensions between adolescents with high and low eating disorder risk. Method: 2142 adolescents from Alicante (1130 girls and 1012 boys), mean age 13.96 years (SD = 1.34), completed the Spanish version of the The Child and Adolescent Perfectionism Scale (CAPS) and the EAT-40.Results: Self-Oriented Perfectionism and Socially Prescribed Perfectionism were positively associated with EAT-40 total score, and with the different factors that comprise it, in both genders. Adolescents with high risk of developing an eating disorder showed higher Self-Oriented Perfectionism and Socially Prescribed Perfectionism than adolescents with low risk of developing the disorder. Conclusion: These results suggest that it is necessary to identify these perfectionist tendencies in adolescents before they become pathological behaviors, in order to prevent the development of an eating disorder.

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Author Biographies

Lidia Pamies, Universidad Miguel Hernández de Elche

Departamento Psicologia de la Salud.

Universidad Miguel Hernández . Elche

Yolanda Quiles, Universidad Miguel Hernández de Elche

Departamento Psicología de la Salud.

Universidad Miguel Hernández de Elche

Published
08-04-2014
How to Cite
Pamies, L., & Quiles, Y. (2014). Perfectionism and risk factors for the development of eating disorders in Spanish adolescents of both genders. Anales De Psicología / Annals of Psychology, 30(2), 620-626. https://doi.org/10.6018/analesps.30.2.158441
Section
Adolescence and psychology