Essentialization processes in men and women: A Brazil-Spain comparative study

  • Marcos Emanoel pereira Profesor Titular de Psicología Social en la Universidade Federal da Bahia, Instituto de Psicologia. Campus Universitário São Lázaro 41940-220 - Salvador, BA - Brasil e-mail: memanoel@gmail.com
  • José Luis Álvaro Estramiana Catedrático de Psicología Social. Departamento de Psicología Social. Facultad de Ciencias Políticas y Sociología. Universidad Complutense de Madrid
  • Alicia Garrido Luque Titular de Psicología Social. Departamento de Psicología Social. Facultad de Ciencias Políticas y Sociología. Universidad Complutense de Madrid
Keywords: Gender, stereotypes, essentilization, naturalization, entitativity.

Abstract

The main objective of this research is to present the results of an experiment based in the brain transplant paradigm. It was done in Brazil and Spain and its aim was to study various essentialization processes among different social categories. It was possible to identify that naturalizable social categories are more essentialized than entitative ones, that essencialization is greater in Brazil than in Spain, and that the direction of the supposed brain transplant in which the experiment was based had an impact only among Spanish participants. In both countries the attribution of internal causes was the most common explanation together with a biologization of gender with special reference to hormones and genes used as arguments to elaborate common sense explanations of human behavior. Altogether the results found lead us to the conclusion than essentialization plays an important role in the perpetuation of sexism and other forms of gender roles stereotypes.

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Author Biographies

Marcos Emanoel pereira, Profesor Titular de Psicología Social en la Universidade Federal da Bahia, Instituto de Psicologia. Campus Universitário São Lázaro 41940-220 - Salvador, BA - Brasil e-mail: memanoel@gmail.com
Profesor titular de psicología social en la Universidad Federal de Bahia (Brasil)
José Luis Álvaro Estramiana, Catedrático de Psicología Social. Departamento de Psicología Social. Facultad de Ciencias Políticas y Sociología. Universidad Complutense de Madrid
Catedrático de Psicología Social del Departamento de Psicología Social de la Universidad Complutense de Madrid.

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Published
25-12-2015
How to Cite
pereira, M. E., Álvaro Estramiana, J. L., & Garrido Luque, A. (2015). Essentialization processes in men and women: A Brazil-Spain comparative study. Anales De Psicología / Annals of Psychology, 32(1), 190-198. https://doi.org/10.6018/analesps.32.1.190841
Section
Social Psychology