Minors’ exposure to online pornography: Prevalence, motivations, contents and effects. (La exposición de los menores a la pornografía en Internet: prevalencia, motivaciones, contenidos y efectos)

  • Eva González Ortega Faculty of Psychology, University of Salamanca. Avda.de la Merced, 109-131, 37005, Salamanca, Spain. E-mail: evagonz@usal.es
  • Begoña Orgaz Baz Faculty of Psychology, University of Salamanca.
Keywords: Internet, pornography, adolescents, gender differences, effects.

Abstract

Since Internet has made pornographic materials more available, there is a need for more research on the characteristics and implications of children’s and adolescents’ exposure to such materials. This study examined the prevalence and extent of minors’ exposure to online pornography, the reasons for exposure, the types of images seen and the strong effects of exposure, as reported by college students. We used an online survey to collect retrospective reports of a sample of 494 students of the University of Salamanca. Results show that 63% of boys and 30% of girls were exposed to online pornography during adolescence. Boys are more likely to have ever been exposed for more than 30 minutes. Boys are more likely to report deliberate consumption and sexual excitement seeking, whereas girls are more likely to report involuntary exposure. Both genders remember viewing a variety of images, including contents of bondage, child pornography and rape. One in six of exposed participants remember strong reactions. While more boys report sexual excitement and masturbation, more girls report avoidance, disgust or concern.

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Published
28-04-2013
How to Cite
González Ortega, E., & Orgaz Baz, B. (2013). Minors’ exposure to online pornography: Prevalence, motivations, contents and effects. (La exposición de los menores a la pornografía en Internet: prevalencia, motivaciones, contenidos y efectos). Anales De Psicología / Annals of Psychology, 29(2), 319-327. https://doi.org/10.6018/analesps.29.2.131381
Section
Clinical and Health Psychology